Monthly Archives: April 2014

Traffic Relief

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April 25  |  Transportation  |   Carl Guardino

Here’s food for thought . . . If you don’t ask, you don’t know.

Annually, the Silicon Valley Leadership Group commissions a professional survey of 600 likely Silicon Valley voters. As a policy organization consisting of nearly 400 CEOs and senior officers, it is important for us to understand if the concerns expressed in board rooms are similar to the concerns conveyed in our employee’s living rooms.

Our most recent survey was completed on April 13. We asked voters for their views on housing and homelessness, traffic and transportation, education and the economy, taxes and fees. The responses underscored, in this visionary Valley, that voters still want to invest in making our communities better. This was clearly conveyed in the questions about transportation.

  • When voters were asked if they would once again tax themselves for specific transportation improvements:
  • More than 2/3 said YES for Phase II of the BART extension, from Berryessa to downtown San Jose and Santa Clara.
  • More than 2/3 said YES for Caltrain commuter rail improvements from Gilroy to Palo Alto.
  • More than 2/3 said YES for street maintenance and pothole repairs in all 15 cities and towns.
  • More than 2/3 said YES to improve all eight county expressways: Almaden, Capitol, Central, Foothill, Lawrence, Montague, Oregon, San Tomas.
  • More than 2/3 said YES to bike and pedestrian improvements, especially near schools.
  • And more than 2/3 said YES to transit services for seniors and the disabled.

Our question – which will have to be thoughtfully considered by all stakeholders – is simple: Is the timing right to invest again?

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Supervisors Chiu and Wiener Show Courage and Conviction

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April 17  |  Transportation  |   Carl Guardino

Here’s food for thought . . . Effective leaders combine courage and conviction with the pragmatic need to build coalitions and common ground.

Recently, in the City and County of San Francisco, such skills were readily apparent in the strong leadership of Board of Supervisors’ President David Chiu and Supervisor Scott Weiner.

Their leadership is especially appreciated as it was around the politically contentious issue of shuttle buses.

Those opposing shuttle buses, with tactics ranging from blocking buses and making speeches, to destructive and divisive tactics like throwing rocks and shouting insults, would make many politicians cower or conform. Not so with Supervisors Chiu and Weiner. Why? Because the facts about the benefits of shuttles still far outweigh the drawbacks – and companies who care enough about their employees and our communities to provide these services should be lauded, not lambasted.

Consider the facts:

  • Shuttle buses remove 20 million vehicle miles traveled annually.
  • 28 percent of shuttle bus riders forgo even owning a car.
  • Shuttles take 9,000 tons of greenhouse gases annually out of our atmosphere.
  • These shuttles eliminate 327,000 annual single passenger trips.

Courage. Conviction. Words we do not always hear associated with elected officials. Kudos to Chiu and Wiener for reminding us that leaders still exist, and are still effective.

Comcast Op-Ed Headline on Forbes.com Misleading

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April 17  |  Uncategorized  |   Carl Guardino

The headline on an op-ed I authored that appeared on Forbes.com on Tuesday was misleading because the views expressed were my personal opinion. The headline implied I was writing on behalf of the point of view of Silicon Valley CEOs. That was not the case

“The op-ed did not make any reference to a decision on the merger by the Silicon Valley Leadership Group or a reference to Silicon Valley CEO’s opinion on the subject,” Guardino said. “It was strictly my opinion and a request has been made to have the headline corrected.”

CEOs in D.C.

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April 2  |  Federal Issues, Government Relations  |   Carl Guardino

Here’s food for thought . . . Silicon Valley and Washington, D.C. – Separated by three time zones? Or the Twilight Zone?

Last week, the Silicon Valley Leadership Group took 50 CEOs and senior executives, along with several local elected leaders, to Washington, D.C. for three days.

It is never a small request to ask executives, running global companies, to set aside the demands of their businesses to travel to D.C.

In a Valley where product life cycles can last as little as six months, CEOs often scratch their heads as Congress takes years, sometimes decades, to tackle issues of great importance to America’s economy:

  • Immigration Reform: More than three decades have passed since major reforms were last enacted.
  • Tax Reform: Four decades.
  • Patent Reform: Before a partial overhaul in 2011, the last meaningful action was nearly 70 years ago.

So why do executives and local elected leaders still slog back to D.C.?

First, through patience and persistence, successes do happen: Consider our victory in securing the Regional Patent Office in San Jose, and $900 million in matching funds for our BART extension.

Second, relationships are strengthened. Silicon Valley is the earth’s epicenter of innovation. D.C. is the capitol of our democracy. Differences will remain, but we must focus on the bridges that must be built. Citizen engagement is good for America, good for our democracy, and good for the innovation that drives our country’s economy.

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