trade

The Death of TPP Impacts You and Me

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January 25  |  Tech & Innovation  |   Carl Guardino

Here’s food for thought . . . Does the death of TPP matter to you and me?

TPP – the Trans-Pacific Partnership – was President Obama’s seven-year effort for an international trade agreement between 12 Pacific Rim countries, representing 40 percent of global GDP.

I say “was” because, as promised, one of President Trump’s first actions in office was to end America’s participation in TPP. His stated reason, pulling out of TPP is “good for American workers.”

I guess that is true, unless you are one of 45 million American workers who’s jobs are dependent on international trade. In fact, American jobs tied to trade pay, on average, 18 percent higher wages than the same American job that is not tied to international trade.

In Silicon Valley alone, just looking at the three Congressional Districts that take in San Jose – the 17th (Ro Khanna), 18th (Anna Eshoo) and 19th (Zoe Lofgren) – 105,000 local workers, and by extension their families, have jobs dependent on international trade.

Pulling out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership negatively impacts the lives and livelihoods of those 105,000 local workers, and their families.

Thanks to President Obama’s seven-year effort, TPP also had the highest labor standards and the highest environmental standards of any trade deal in the history of the world. And those standards were enforceable.

In addition, TPP protected individuals and employers, in terms of our personal data privacy, and our companies’ intellectual property.

Some think that international trade only impacts tech-workers. Not true. Jobs depending on international trade range from financial services to farming, agriculture to entertainment, to name but a few.

Here in Silicon Valley, where 26 of every 100 jobs are with a tech company, it matters even more. Without a robust tech-driven economy, there are fewer dollars in disposable income to spend in restaurants and retail, dry cleaners and department stores, auto dealerships and home purchases.

So who’s smiling because of the President’s Executive Order killing U.S. participation in TPP? Primarily the Chinese Government, who are already stepping in to negotiate trade deals with the remaining TPP countries. You can bet those deals will not benefit American workers, employers or our economy.

The death of TPP negatively impacts you and me, and the strength of Silicon Valley’s economy.

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Silicon Valley’s Economy Depends on Trade

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May 25  |  Tech & Innovation  |   Carl Guardino

Here’s food for thought . . . Silicon Valley’s robust economy depends on trade

In a recent survey of 600 Santa Clara County voters, commissioned by the Silicon Valley Leadership Group, President Obama’s 7-year effort to expand the trade of American goods and services to eleven countries in the Asia-Pacific is supported by a two-to-one margin.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership – or TPP – is a Trade Agreement between the United States and 11 countries along the Pacific Rim, with nearly 800 million people, accounting for 40 percent of global trade. Along with the United States, the countries engaged in the Trans-Pacific Partnership include Japan, Malaysia, Vietnam, Singapore, Brunei, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Mexico, Chile and Peru.

President Obama deserves praise for successfully negotiating with the other 11 countries for the strongest environmental standards of any U.S. Trade Agreement in history.

The President also successfully negotiated with the other 11 countries for the highest labor standards of any U.S. Trade Agreement in history, including the rights of workers in other countries to form Unions and to establish minimum wages for workers.

In Santa Clara County alone, there are 105,000 local jobs that are dependent on Trade with other countries. Those local jobs support tens of thousands of local families who drive our region’s economy.

And jobs tied to trade pay better than jobs that do not depend on trade. In fact, American jobs that are tied to trade pay – on average – 18 percent higher salaries and benefits than the same type of job that is not tied to trade.

When Santa Clara County voters were asked if they support or oppose President Obama’s efforts to have Congress pass the Trans-Pacific Partnership before he leaves office in January of 2017, the results were clear:

* 57 percent support the President on trade
* Only 29 percent oppose the President on trade
* With 14 percent offering no opinion

The Trans-Pacific Partnership – a Trade Agreement carefully crafted by President Obama – is good for working families throughout Silicon Valley; and deserves the support of Congress before he leaves office next year.

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