78% of Voters in Santa Clara County: Like Commuter Shuttle Buses and Almost Equal Number Say They Want More of the Same

SAN JOSE, CA – As traffic congestion stalls the most stalwart commuters on two of the Bay Area’s most congested corridors, Highways 280 and 101, potential voters say they’re willing to share the road and designated transportation facilities to ease traffic. 78 percent of 600 likely voters in Santa Clara County said they believe privately-operated commuter bus shuttles have had a positive impact in reducing traffic on local streets and roads.

“This speaks to the Bay Area resident’s capacity for creative solutions and out of the box thinking,” said CEO & President of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group Carl Guardino, who is also a California Transportation Commissioner. “According to the recent Silicon Valley Competitiveness and Innovation Survey conducted with Silicon Valley Community Foundation, the average worker spends an hour and10 minutes commuting per day, second only to New Yorkers who daily spend an hour and 14 minutes in their cars. What better solution to ease commuter pain than tech companies offering a taxpayer free congestion solution – third-party company shuttles.”

While commuters often see employer-shuttle buses gliding by on highways and freeways, they’re just as critical and effective for the “first mile” and “last mile” commutes in cities where they link riders to VTA, Samtrans and Caltrain stations, worksites to worksites and home to work services. Current private company shuttles result in more than 34,000 riders boarding private Bay Area shuttles every work day. 90 percent of those riders own a car, but choose to ride shuttles instead preventing 2,000 tons of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) from being released into the atmosphere every year.

Not only do residents say they’re willing to share the road, but they’re willing to share access to public transportation facilities as well. 73 percent of voters said they believe privately-operated commuter bus shuttles operated by tech companies to help deliver their employees to work, should be allowed to use public transit stops.

“The benefits of employer-run commuter shuttles are indisputable,” said Jim Wunderman, President and CEO of the Bay Area Council. “In leading a coalition of some of the region’s largest employers over the past six years to develop a landmark, first-of-its-kind commuter shuttles program, we learned firsthand how valuable shuttles are in getting cars off of our congested roads and highways, taking pressure off overwhelmed public transit systems and avoiding polluting tailpipe emissions. And we get those benefits while ensuring safe shuttle operations that minimize impacts on streets and neighborhoods.”

In Santa Clara County, this proposed solution would not impact city street bus stops but would provide employer shuttles access to certain transportation facilities as well as institute a formal permitting process for the use of these facilities.

The 2017 Silicon Valley Leadership Group Annual “Silicon Valley” Poll was conducted by J. Moore Methods Inc. Public Opinion Research from May 3rd through May 9th and surveyed 1,200 registered voters in Santa Clara, San Francisco and San Mateo counties. These results are for Santa Clara County polling 600 likely voters with a +/- 2.6 percent margin of error.

Commuter Bus Shuttles Questions
Should privately-owned bus shuttles, operated by tech companies to help deliver their employees to work, be allowed to use public transit stops ?

YES/ALLOW USE. ………………….. 73
NO/DO NOT ALLOW USE. …………….. 16
NO OPINION. …………………… 11

Do you believe privately-operated commuter bus shuttles have had a positive impact in reducing traffic on local streets and roads ?

YES/POSITIVE IMPACT. ……………. 78
NO/NEGATIVE IMPACT. ……………… 10
NO OPINION. …………………… 12

Media Contacts:
Kimberly Ellis, SVP Communications and Marketing
Kellis@svlg.org/(408) 501-7853
Nancy Sanchez, Sr. Dir. of Communications
Nsanchez@svlg.org/ (408) 501-7879

 

On June 29th, 2017, posted in: Press Releases by