Education Summit 2016

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 On August 25, 2016 the Silicon Valley Leadership Group hosted nearly 400 people at its annual Education Summit at Microsoft in Mountain View. Below are videos of the sessions, focus-area briefs, and links to additional resources from the exhibitors. A recap of the event can also be found on Microsoft Bay Area’s blog.

Session Videos and Focus-Area Briefs

Morning Keynote: Ebony Frelix, SVP Philanthropy and Engagement, Salesforce.org

Welcome: Kristina Peralta: Director of Education and Workforce Preparedness, Silicon Valley Leadership Group
Jonathan Noble: Director, US Government Affairs, Microsoft
Introduction: Dr. Jannett Jackson: Chancellor, Chabot Las Positas Community College District
Moderator: Hydra Mendoza: Senior Advisor of Education and Family Services for the Office of San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee

Afternoon Keynote: Linda Darling-Hammond, President and CEO, Learning Policy Institute and Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education Emeritus at Stanford University

Introduction: Carl Guardino, President and CEO, Silicon Valley Leadership Group

Education Technology Resources in K-12 Schools

  • Barbara Means – Co-Director Center for Technology in Learning, SRI International
  • Diane Tavenner – Founder and CEO, Summit Public Schools
  • Mike Sego – Director of Engineering, Facebook
  • Muhammed Chaudhry – President and CEO, Silicon Valley Education Foundation
  • Marc Suidan – Partner, Merger and Acquisition, PwC
  • Kathy Gomez – Superintendent, Evergreen School District

Education Technology Brief

Implementation of New Education Reforms

  • Michael Kirst – President, California State Board of Education and Stanford Emeritus Professor of Education
  • Ted Lempert – President, Children Now
  • Anne Campbell – Superintendent of Schools, County of San Mateo
  • John Fensterwald – Editor-at-Large, EdSource Today
  • Carrie Hahnel – Deputy Director, Research, Policy Analysis and Practice, Education Trust-West

New Education Reforms Brief

Workforce Preparedness to Address Industry Needs

Workforce Preparedness Brief

Diversifying of the STEM Pipeline to Increase the Inclusion and Representation of Women and People of Color in the Workforce

  • Claire Shorall – Computer Science Manager, Oakland Unified School District
  • Brian Stanley – Executive Director, Oakland Education Foundation
  • Dr. Allison Scott – Chief Research Officer, Kapor Center for Social Impact
  • Nikki Lasley – Sr. Program Manager, Education Initiatives, Salesforce.org

Diversifying of the STEM Pipeline Brief

 Exhibitors

Citizen Schools: Facilitates deep partnerships with schools, putting young adults on track to succeed by connecting the resources of communities, companies, governments, and philanthropies.

Ignited: Connects business leaders and scientists with educators to transform the classroom experience, inspiring students to become the next generation of innovators.

MetroEd: Operates Silicon Valley Career Technical Education Center (SVCTE) and Silicon Valley Adult Education (SVAE). Annually, MetroED collectively serves almost 11,500 students by providing state-of-the-art Career Technical Education and Adult Education programs.

Reading Partners: Mobilizes communities to provide students with the proven, individualized reading support they need to read at grade level by fourth grade.

Silicon Valley Career Pathways: Northern California’s largest network of STEM Education and Career Programs, developing career pathways across k-16 to meet Bay Area employer needs.

Silicon Valley Education Foundation: A nonprofit resource for students and educators, SVEF provides advocacy, programs and resources to help students reach their full potential in the critical areas of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).

Year Up Bay Area: A one-year, intensive training program that provides low-income young adults, ages 18-24, with a combination of hands-on skill development, college credits, and corporate internships. Since opening our doors in 2008, Year Up Bay Area has helped over 500 young adults cross the Opportunity Divide in the San Francisco Bay Area. 88% of their graduates are employed (earning competitive wages) or are attending college within four months of completing the program.


 

Thank you to our sponsors!

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